12 of the best sunglasses for triathlon tested, rated and reviewed to help you find your ideal multi-sport shades

Sunglasses provide vital protection from bugs, grit and the sun when you’re cycling and running. We tested 16 pairs for the July issue of Triathlon Plus magazine (#55). Here are the best ones, which all scored 4/5 or above, in price order.


BUDGET (up to £49)

DHB Triple Lens
£30
wiggle.co.uk

Weight: 27g 
Lenses: Replaceable, wraparound

DHB Triple Lens

In terms of pure bang for your buck, DHB’s Triples are hard to beat. They offer full UV protection and come with three sets of snap-in lenses that are a doddle to swap. There’s no adjustment in the arms or nosepiece though, and because the lenses aren’t as deep as on other sunglasses, they can seem a bit gappy. While the wide lenses give good peripheral coverage, they lack the pinpoint clarity offered by more expensive sunnies. This is a minor niggle however, and if you’re buying on price alone you’ll be more than satisfied with their performance.

Verdict: Great value entry-level eyewear set but the fit could be better

Performance 3/5
Value 5/5
Overall 4/5


Ryders Hex – Top Value Award
£35
ryderseyewear.com

Weight: 25g 
Lenses: Replaceable, split lens

Ryders Hex

The Hex is a split-lens design that weighs just 25g, at a price that should make some of the higher-priced models here hang their heads in shame. Despite the waiflike weight these glasses offer a firm fit and a sturdy design. The arms and nosepiece are high-friction rubber; neither element is adjustable, but if they fit your face you’re rewarded with a set of sunnies that works as well as any to deflect sun and flying nasties. They’re bundled with three sets of lenses – clear, hi-viz yellow and smoke grey – that are a doddle to swap (grip and pull).

Verdict: Cracking value split-lens option with a good fit and solid design

Performance 4/5
Value 5/5
Overall 4/5

MID-RANGE (£50-£99)

Tifosi Podium  – Top Value Award
£60
zyro.co.uk

Weight: 27g
Lenses: Replaceable, wraparound

Tifosi Podium

The rimless Podiums are new from Tifosi and closely resemble the Endura Crossbows (below) and Smith PivLocks (p3). They share the PivLocks’ ability to swap out lenses – smoke, clear and orange – for use in changeable light. The wired, rubberised sections of the arms and nosepiece mean they can be shaped to fit. Like all the rimless models on test, the Podiums offer awesome head-down and peripheral vision, but have less mechanical grip to exert than brow-rim designs. However, they still have good levels of friction from the rubber elements and offer a solid fit.

Verdict: A cracking price for this versatile rimless model with easy-to-swap lenses

Performance 4/5
Value 5/5
Overall 4/5


Endura CrossBow
£75
endura.co.uk

Weight: 23g
Lenses: Fixed, wraparound

Endura CrossBow

Endura is stepping up its eyewear game and the new rimless Crossbows take the challenge to the likes of Smith’s PivLock V2s and the Rudy HyperMasks, asking serious questions about why you need to pay more. A variable-tint photochromic lens allows the Crossbows to adapt to a range of conditions in just eight seconds, letting between 28 and 82 per cent of light through. In UK spring weather they proved ideal, taking both the usual flat grey light and occasional visits from the sun in their stride. The shapeable wire core arms and nosepiece give a personalised fit that aids stability.

Verdict: Fast-adapting lenses and rimless design at a great price, but no other lens options

Performance 4/5
Value 4/5
Overall 4/5


Scott Leap  – Peak Performer Award
£80
scott-sports.com

Weight: 30g 
Lenses: Replaceable, wraparound

Scott Leap

The Leaps are Scott’s best sports glasses to date. Fit is exceptional, with the twin-radius curved arms giving a perfect three-point fit and the soft rubber nosepiece offering zero bounce. Helmet strap compatibility is also spot on. The lens gives a clear, unobstructed view, sits high enough that the brow frame doesn’t impede a head-down view on the bike and is perfect for running. We’d love a slightly softer, narrower nose rubber to fine-tune the distance between face and glasses but overall we really like the Leaps.

Verdict: A really good model with features you’d expect to see on far pricier specs

Performance 5/5
Value 4/5
Overall 4/5


Uvex SGL 202 Race
£90
uvex.de, raleigh.co.uk

Weight: 25g
Lenses: Replaceable, split lens 

Uvex SGL 202 Race

Uvex has done a full-scale research job on the SGL 202s. They’re almost entirely rimless, using a single central section of brow frame (with mouldable nose pad) to add rigidity and keep them snug on your face. That leaves the top and bottom edges of the lenses free of obstruction, so they work well in head-down riding scenarios. The arms are light and mouldable, and of the minimalist models on test, the SGL 202s were some of the most secure. We chose the Variomatic lens, which offers a fast transition from dark to bright.

Verdict: Good value sunglasses offering superb fit and fast-reacting lenses

Performance 4/5
Value 4/5
Overall 4/5


Spiuk Arqus
£90
spiuk.com, silverfish-uk.com

Weight: 26g 
Lenses: Replaceable, wraparound

Spiuk Arqus

Spiuk’s Arqus sunglasses follow the style of the classic Oakley Radars (see p3) and enjoy a similarly svelte weight. Although fractionally wider than many of the others on test, they held on without wobbling or feeling loose; triathletes with larger craniums should give them a go. The frame is shaped to place the bridge a bit higher than on the Radars, so it’s less visible when tucked on the aerobars – a nice touch that could be a dealmaker for some. They come with three sets of vented polycarbonate lenses – clear, dark smoke and orange – which are simple to switch.

Verdict: A good fit option for larger heads with a nice selection of lenses

Performance 4/5
Value 4/5
Overall 4/5

PREMIUM (£100+)

BBB Select PH
£120
bbbcycling.com

Weight: 32g 
Lenses: Replaceable, wraparound

BBB Select PH

BBB makes a massive range of cycle clothing and accessories, and while you might think this jack of all trades would produce so-so eyewear, think again. Grip levels are good enough to keep the 32g Selects from shifting when you’re on the move. The nosepiece is grippy and we like the wire core, which can be shaped to fit irregular-shaped noses. We chose the PH photochromic lens, which takes just eight seconds to switch from dull-day 85 per cent light transmission to 17 per cent when the sun comes out – just right for most UK conditions.

Verdict: The variable transmission photochromic lens option is a great one-stop choice

Performance 4/5
Value 3/5
Overall 4/5


Smith PivLock V2
£139
smithoptics.com, ultrasporteu.com

Weight: 24g
Lenses: Replaceable, wraparound 

Smith PivLock V2

The Pivlock V2s have no brow frame and feel as near to having nothing on your face as it’s possible to get. The downside to this rimless freedom is that the lens is all there is to give the eyewear its sprung shape, so if you like a tight fit you might find the PivLocks – and the other rimless models tested here – unnervingly light on your face. They don’t budge while riding or running, but the feel can take a bit of adjustment. It’s a fast process to chop between clear, rose and dark smoke lens options, with a 90° pop-in fit that takes longer to describe than it does to achieve.

Verdict: Awesome head-down performance and fast lens changing

Performance 5/5
Value 3/5
Overall 4/5


Adidas Evil Eye HalfRim Pro
£170
adidas.co.uk

Weight: 28g 
Lenses: Replaceable, split lens

Adidas Evil Eye HalfRim Pro

The HalfRim Pros have a couple of cool tricks up their sleeves: three-point arm adjustment and a dual-position nosepiece. It’s simple to get the glasses sitting straight on your face and also to adjust the lens angle – useful for head-down riding and venting. The optics are crisp and there’s a tint for every condition. Spare lenses are included, along with a detachable brow pad. The arms have rubberised inserts but we’d like a bit more grip. Each element of the Halfrims is replaceable, which makes them a solid choice.

Verdict: A highly adjustable, rugged option in two frame sizes

Performance 4/5
Value 3/5
Overall 4/5


Oakley RadarLock Edge  – Gold Award
£195
oakley.com

Weight: 28g 
Lenses: Replaceable, wraparound

Oakley RadarLock Edge

Oakley’s iconic Radars set the bar pretty high and their influence can be seen in dozens of other sports glasses. Light, exceptionally stable on the face and with market-leading optics, the new RadarLocks are a joy to use. Available in two frame fits, we tested the narrow, straight-arm model. It comes with multiple lens shapes, from the super-deep XL for head-down riding to this shallow Edge model for women and smaller-faced gents. We could live without the new Lock lens system – clever as it is – as the older Radars work just as well for £50 less.

Verdict: Optically awesome; these glasses set the bar for the rest to meet

Performance 5/5
Value 3/5
Overall 4/5


Assos Zegho
£280
assos.com, yellow-limited.co.uk

Weight: 25g 
Lenses: Fixed, wraparound

Assos Zegho

The Zeghos’ aesthetic, with large lenses and extreme curvature, divides opinion, but it does achieve Assos’s goal of total protection from glare, wind and debris. The rimless design is light and offers unrestricted forward and peripheral vision. The huge Zeiss lenses are non-replaceable but on the Werkmannschaft model we tested feature an unusual graduated smoke-to-clear tint that performed well in the varied conditions we rode in. The Zeghos are among the most stable glasses we tested. If you can fund the purchase and like the look, they deliver great performance.

Verdict: Great fit with crystal-clear optics, but at an eye-watering price

Performance 4/5
Value 3/5
Overall 4/5